May 14, 2019

UCalgary researchers awarded funding under inaugural New Frontiers program

Government of Canada supports international, interdisciplinary, high-risk research

The inaugural New Frontiers in Research Fund (NFRF), launched December 2018 by the federal government, is focused on supporting innovative, interdisciplinary research that has the potential to deliver significant benefits to Canadians. Twelve early-career University of Calgary researchers from across the academy received NFRF funding to pursue their high-risk, high-reward work.

"Our government's vision is for our researchers to take risks and be innovative,” says the Honorable Kirsty Duncan, minister of science and sport. “We want our scientists and students to have access to state-of-the-art laboratories and equipment, and we want the halls of academia to better reflect the diversity of Canada itself. This new fund will help us achieve that vision."

“Our early-career researchers are a critical part of the research engine of our university,” says Dr. André Buret, interim vice-president (research). “The recipients bring leading-edge ideas and methodologies to their fields, and increase the potential impact of their work by collaborating across disciplinary boundaries. They inspire us all to get creative in our pursuit of solutions to the most pressing challenges faced by Canadians.”

This portion of the NFRF is the Exploration stream, one of the three that comprise the funding: Exploration; Transformation, which will provide large-scale support for interdisciplinary and transformative research; and International, which will focus on internationally partnered research.

The Arts recipients of the NFRF – Exploration funding are:

  • Dr. Jennifer Leason, PhD (Anthropology and Archaeology): Exploring the Complex Contexts of Indigenous Maternal Child Health through an Indigenous Maternity Experiences Survey
  • Dr. Brent Else, PhD (Geography): Mobile Labs to Support Interdisciplinary Research Along Shipping Corridors in the Canadian Arctic
  • Dr. Amanda Melin, PhD (Anthropology and Archaeology): The aging eye: integrating genomics, anatomy, and behaviour across the lifespan in a non-human primate model